Walking

Here's something to help get motivated: National Walk to Work Day is this Friday October 1 - click on the link to find out more and get some tips on how to walk to work if you think you live too far away.
I've pledged to put my feet first so let me know if you'd like a walking buddy :)
There's also the Women's and Girls' Jogalong this Sunday (being the first Sunday of the month) at beautiful Weston Park in Yarralumla - 8.45am for aerobics warm up then staggered starts from 9am (3km walkers start first). I missed last month but hope to make it there this time!
Floriade is also a wonderful event to spend a lot of time walking enjoying Canberra spring time. It's on until Sunday October 10.

Curb your enthusiasm - just a little bit...

It's great to see more people out and about being active due to the warmer, well sunnier, weather. At my local playing fields kite flying is popular at the moment, the cricket nets are always busy and there are families and groups of friends kicking footballs around, people walking and others jogging.

If you have been sedantary during winter be careful not to go too hard too fast too soon- Sports Medicine Australia have a good article up on their website 'Spring into Exercise Safely' check it out (click on the link). Generally it's a good idea in the first couple of weeks to ease into your new activity and allow a full recovery day between each session to allow time for your body to adapt. All going well you can then apply the FITT principle:

Frequency - increase the number of sessions OR
Intensity - increase the level of effort (eg. walk to walk-jog, increase weight lifted) OR
Time - increase the amount of time for each session or increase the number of sets OR
Type - change the exercise (eg. pinned machines to free weights, jogging on the flat to jogging on hills)

To keep your training interesting and challenging apply the FITT principle every two weeks.

Fun Run for Brain Tumour Awareness – 6th November 2010

Train for the Brain and help find a cure for brain cancer.

Join in for a 5km or 10km walk or run to help raise awareness about brain tumours and to raise funds for the Cure for Life Foundation.

The event starts at 10am 6 November at Commonwealth Park.

Exercise Footwear


If you play a sport you already know that you need the right footwear for the job.

  • Don't wear your running shoes for anything but running - you don't want to destroy the special absorption soles any quicker than they do from normal use: six months if you run regularly; three months if you run a lot.
  • If you do lots of cross training (like outdoor circuits or boot camp) in a single session get some cross training shoes.
  • If you do dedicated weight sessions go old school and go barefoot if your gym will let you, or get some shoes with good grip on the soles (old runners, happy shoes or actual weight training shoes) and if you need it, ankle support
  • Boxing fitness training it's good to have ankle support for fancy footwork moves
  • Flexibility, posture, yoga, gymnastics and acrobatic training are all good to do in bare feet - again only if your gym allows it, otherwise something like happy shoes or sneakers will do the job
  • Serious cyclists use toe-clip shoes, less serious cyclists have cages on their pedals. If you've got cages on your pedals watch out that your shoe laces don't get caught in the cage - I've had both feet get caught which made for a very amusing horizontal dismount! I now cycle in my Baxter boots which also keep my toes nice and warm in cold or rainy weather.
  • Hiking and walking need sturdier shoes, don't be tempted to wear your old runners

My fave training shoes are my converse hi-tops. The laces are flat so they don't get caught in my pedal cages, they've got grippy rubber soles good for weight training, they're flexible enough for stretching in and I can wear them as regular shoes too - and they weren't expensive like my runners!

Photo (left to right): bare feet, old runners, high top sneakers, good runners, Baxter boots, hiking boots; and at the back fins for pool work.